Chaplin Competitor Discovered

An excerpt from Mack Sennett’s Fun Factory by Brent Walker On November 9, 1923, Sennett signed Langdon to a lucrative two-year contract, prior to releasing his first comedy.  However, instead of Smile Please, the first Langdon Sennett comedy released by Pathé was Picking Peaches (initially previewed on November 27, 1923, and released on February 3, 1924).…

The Langdon Thing

By Trav S.D. – Author of Chain of Fools – Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to YouTube and No Applause – Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, and renowned blogger – http://travsd.wordpress.com  This is strictly anecdotal of course, but it seems to me there are three concentric circles to the public’s relationship to silent film…

Enigma Chaser

By Wayne Powers The evolution of Langdon’s unique “elf” character has been explored, acknowledged and acclaimed internationally by some of the most respected film historians and scholars.  Langdon’s trail-blazing comedic approach had a tremendous impact on the output of his peers, (especially Stan Laurel), and launched a sea change in the direction of film comedy.…

A Soldier’s Plaything (1930)

An excerpt from LITTLE ELF: A Celebration of Harry Langdon by Chuck Harter & Michael Hayde Long unavailable to most comedy fans and scholars, Langdon’s Roach shorts — at least the six available for viewing — are a mixed bag, but the majority are quite funny, and for the most part successfully integrate the Little Elf into…

Capitolfest 12 shows MY WEAKNESS!

I just came back from Capitolfest in Rome, NY and boy oh boy, what an experience!  Work prevented me from attending the whole weekend, but I was fortunate enough to visit Sunday and catch amongst other films a Langdon feature, My Weakness (1933).  Out of all the films that were scheduled, I was most excited about this one…

Nobody’s Baby – Part V

The Curious History of Harry Langdon, Hal Roach, and Laurel & Hardy Nobody’s Baby – Part V by Chris Seguin Gone, but not forgotten While Harry’s performing career took a serious blow (you might even say “fatal” – there would be no big comeback hopes after this), he was back on the script-writing team for…

Day 30 of 30 Days of Harry!

I thought I’d end this month-long celebration of our beloved Harry the same way I started it, with another splendid still from Zenobia (1939).  I can’t believe it’s already over… it’s like a kick in the pants.  No worries though, there’s still plenty of wonderful posts coming in the near future regarding the “Little Elf.” Harry with Oliver…